Download Deportation and Exile: Poles in the Soviet Union, 1939-48 by K. Sword PDF

By K. Sword

Deportation and Exile describes the destiny of thousands of Poles - males, girls and kids - deported to Soviet territory by means of Stalin's defense organisations among 1939 and 1948. Amnestied in 1941, recruited to shine devices shaped on Soviet soil, tens of millions made their go out into Persia in 1942. the remaining both made their as far back as Poland as strive against troops, having been recruited to a moment, communist-led military in 1943-44, in any other case awaited formal repatriation agreements concluded in the direction of the top of the warfare.

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Additional info for Deportation and Exile: Poles in the Soviet Union, 1939-48

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Most Poles at home, however, like those elsewhere, understood the reasons for the Agreement and signalled their approval. The Sikorski-Maisky Pact (1941) and the 'Amnesty' 33 POLISH-SOVIET COOPERATION Sikorski had been pondering the choice of a suitable ambassador for Moscow before the talks with Maisky were brought to a conclusion. His eventual choice was partly determined by circumstances, but also in large measure by personal loyalties. His first choice had been the prewar Polish premier, Kazimierz Bartel, who was known to have been in Lwdw under the Soviet occupation.

It is unlikely, however, that Soviet officials had reliable and up-to-date statistics of this kind - still less that they would have taken the trouble to collect them after war broke out. The most probable explanation, as Gross suggests, is that the figures were a guess, a deliberate deception. 88 2 The Sikorski-Maisky Pact of 1941 and the 'Amnesty' for Poles Confined on Soviet Territory THE SIGNING OF THE PACT On 22 June 1941, Hitler launched Operation Barbarossa against the Soviet Union. Five-and-a-half million men, 3500 tanks and 4000 aircraft were hurled at the Reich's unsuspecting ally along a front of some 3000 km.

Some time later, Poles gathered outside the House of Culture, raised a makeshift flag and made speeches, sang and cheered. 37 The effect on the local Soviet population is reported in many of the Polish accounts. In the camps, the Poles were generally regarded with envy by their fellow-prisoners; their new status often brought lighter conditions and treatment, although they were expected to continue working - even on threat of court proceedings until the necessary confirmation of release came through from official sources.

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